BenQ W1080ST Home Theater Projector Review

BenQ W1080ST Projector Highlights

  • 2000 lumens bright – suitable for family/living/bonus rooms
  • 3D Capable including Blu-ray 3D
  • Higher contrast for better blacks, than most low cost projectors
  • 10 watts of Audio, plus an audio output
  • Full color management controls, ISF certified
  • Minimal lag times for great gaming
  • Remote control
  • Smart-Eco for energy efficiency (see more below)
  • Very long lamp life (for low cost of operation)
  • New lighter 3D glasses from BenQ (not included)
  • Typical Warranty

Overview

The BenQ W1080ST is almost identical to the last BenQ home projector we reviewed, which would be their W1070.  The BenQ W1080ST is a home theater projector that differentiates itself by sporting a short throw zoom lens.  That makes the W1080ST a more convenient alternative for those who are placing on a table top, in many homes.  It puts the projector in front of the audience, closer to the screen.  It means people can move around without necessarily blocking the image (walking through the bright light).

Ultimately the BenQ W1080ST is a great little home entertainment projector.  It has built in sound, so you can take it outside in the summer for entertainment without much fuss (a waterproof extension power cord, and a garage door to shine a movie on).

The W1080ST is a single chip DLP projector. It is full 1080p resolution, and it is 3D capable.  It has HDMI 1.4 which allows this BenQ W1080ST projector to support Blu-ray 3D, which gives it a competitive edge over several lower cost projectors and crossover projectors.

Physically the W1080ST is a good looking box, as BenQ has attempted to give it some style.  But, it’s still a box shaped projector.  More important is its smallish size, and far more important is its picture quality!

Also of extreme importance to you all is the BenQ W1080ST price. The official MAP price, the lowest an authorized dealer is allowed to advertise on the internet (or anywhere), is $1099. Keep that in mind, if you see it for less, then the dealer is quite possibly not an authorized dealer, which raises a number of potential issues, including post sale support.  Having owned a large online dealership, I believe consumers are better off when they deal with authorized dealers, if for no other reason than they tend to be more knowledgeable.

The projector recently started shipping.  We received this projector for review before shipping started, but with a backlog and a couple of reports and Infocomm to deal with in April/May/June, we’ve finally finished it.  Note that 3D Glasses are optional – as in, extra.  The official price for the glasses is $79.  Even that is a little less than most others.

The BenQ W1080ST, like its longer throw twin has very good contrast and blacks for the price range, but don’t confuse that with dramatically better black levels found on many projectors starting at less than twice the price. Contrast is very good for a family room projector.  Not so much if you have a dedicated home theater with excellent lighting control.

ESPN 3D is toast!

Recently announced, ESPN is dropping most if not all 3D programming.  Maybe they would have had success if they would have given us some “big time content”, rather than a few boxing matches, and a few NCAA football games from a second tier conference… Tsk!

We showed these images from a little league championship on ESPN 3D, when we reviewed the W1070.  For those not paying attention, however, in June 2013, ESPN announced they were getting out of the 3D biz – at least for now.  With that in mind it didn’t seem to make sense to shoot another pair of images with the W1080ST projector.

Color I found to be reasonably good in 3D. 3D could be calibrated for improved color but we just don’t do that.  Also the world seems to be waiting on a good calibration disc that supports 3D calibration.  I’ve watched plenty of 3D movies off of Blu-ray with the BenQ W1080ST, and found, overall, that color is definitely acceptable.

Overall, very good 3D, lots of brightness, and an almost total lack of rainbow effect  (for me) make these two BenQ projectors the W1080ST (and the W1070) about as good as lower cost DLP projectors get with 3D in terms of overall experience.

In other words:  A good choice for 3D on a budget.

See more Projector at https://projectorpro.in.th

Acer K138ST

  • PROS

    Compact. Lightweight. Can project content from a smartphone. Long lamp life. Short throw distance. Comes in soft carrying case.

  • CONS

    Limited connection choices. Rainbow effect in video. Scaling artifacts visible at projector’s native resolution.

  • BOTTOM LINE

    The LED-based Acer K138ST has a relatively short throw distance and can project content from a smartphone via its MHL-enabled HDMI connection.

The Acer K138ST is a highly portable projector for business or casual use, with a relatively short throw for an LED-based model. The addition of an MHL-enabled HDMI port lets it project content from a smartphone. Video quality isn’t great, however, both due to posterization and a considerable rainbow effect. The InFocus LightPro IN1146, our Editors’ Choice LED projector, shows better video and has more connection choices.

Design and Features

The K138ST is a handsome projector, white with a flat top, curved sides, and rounded corners. It measures 2.3 by 9.4 by 5.8 inches (HWD), making it a little larger than palmtop size and smaller than the InFocus LightPro IN1146. It’s lightweight at 1.7 pounds, and it comes with a soft carrying case.

This DLP-based projector has native WXGA (1,280-by-800) resolution, a rated brightness of 800 ANSI lumens, and a 100,000:1 rated contrast ratio. Its LED light source is rated at 20,000 hours in Normal mode and 30,000 hours in Economy mode, so the bulb should easily last the lifetime of the projector. Its throw ratio of 0.8:1 is at the upper limit of what we would consider a short-throw projector. This lets you place the projector a bit closer to the screen for a given image side than a standard-throw model.

On top of the K138ST is a four-way controller with center button that you can use to access the menu system, as you can also do with the projector’s small remote. Behind the lens is a focus ring. As is the case with most short-throw—and most mini—projectors, it lacks an optical zoom.

One interesting feature is LumiSense, an ambient-light sensor that can adjust the projector’s brightness and color saturation based on local lighting conditions. It can be turned on or off from the projector’s menu.

You can project 3D content with the K138ST, but you’ll need DLP-link active-shutter 3D glasses for each member of your audience. It’s not a great choice for 3D projection, however, as rainbow artifacts are visible in some 3D, as well as 2D, images.

Connectivity

The K138ST has a basic set of inputs, including a VGA port, and an HDMI port, which also supports MHL and lets you project content from your smartphone or tablet. There are also audio-in and audio-out jacks, and a port for a Kensington lock, a good protective measure for such a portable projector. Its USB Type A port is strictly for charging an external device like a phone, as was the case with the Acer C205. In comparison, the InFocus IN1146 adds an SD card slot, and its USB Type A port supports either a USB thumb drive or an optional Wi-Fi dongle.

Data Testing

The projector filled our test screen with an 65-inch image (measured diagonally) when placed a little more than 5 feet away from the projector. In data-image testing using the DisplayMate suite, data-image quality was average for an LED-based DLP projector. Colors were well saturated, but I did notice some purple fringing in a few images.

In some data images, I saw scaling artifacts, which generally appear when there’s a mismatch between the image source’s resolution and a projector’s native resolution. They take the form of extra or thicker lines in patterned fills. This is an issue that the K138ST shares with the InFocus IN1144, the Vivitek Qumi Q6-BU, and all of the other LED-based WXGA projectors we’ve reviewed over the past few years that use a TI DLP chip. In these cases, the artifacts are not due to resolution differences, but to the particular design of these chips and the shape of the pixels. Such artifacts shouldn’t have any effect on images other than those containing patterned fills.

The K138ST’s text quality is typical of an LED projector. In testing, both black text on white and white text on black were easily readable at sizes down to 9 points. I noticed more purple fringing than usual around the text, and within the white letters.

All single-chip DLP projectors are potentially subject to the rainbow effect, which takes the form of little red/green/blue flashes, especially in light areas against dark backgrounds. I noticed rainbow artifacts in several of the K138ST’s images, but they are seldom a significant problem in data images and shouldn’t be an issue here.

Video and Audio Quality

In our video testing, rainbow artifacts were more obvious than is usual for a DLP projector, and would likely be distracting even to people mildly sensitive to the effect. I also noticed some posterization, a tendency for abrupt shifts in color or tone when they should be gradual. Because of these issues, I would limit video use with this projector to short clips, whether YouTube videos or as part of a presentation.

Sound from the K138ST’s twin 3-watt speakers is good for use in a small room. If you turn the volume up more than halfway, you receive an onscreen warning telling you that over-boosting the volume can cause bad sound quality. If you want more volume or better audio, you can connect a set of powered external speakers to the audio-out jack.

Conclusion

The Acer K138ST is compact and easily portable, and it has a relatively short throw for an LED projector, so you can position it close to the screen, and you can also display content from a smartphone attached to its MHL-enabled HDMI port. Its brightness and sound system make it best for use in small rooms, and data-image quality is average, while video is best kept to short clips, mostly because of the rainbow effect. The Editors’Choice InFocus LightPro IN1146 has more connection choices, and more watchable video, with fewer rainbow artifacts, but it lacks the K138ST’s short throw.

See more Projector information at https://projectorpro.in.th

Epson PowerLite Pro G6900WU LCD WUXGA Large Venue Projector

The Epson PowerLite Pro G6900WU is a 6000-lumen WUXGA projector built with large venues in mind. WUXGA resolution is 1920×1200, the new gold standard for conference room and auditorium projectors. It used to be a high-end format, but at this writing there are two hundred WUXGA projectors in production across a wide range of price points. It has broad market appeal due to its versatility — WUXGA projectors will display both 1920×1200 computer signals and HD 1080p video in native format, so it has become the go-to resolution for sharp, detailed projection display.

As installation projectors go, the Epson Pro G6900WU is compact and easy to handle, weighing in at just over 20 lbs. It is a single-lamp projector that is not only rich in features, but also more affordable than dual-lamp models. The Pro G6900WU is powerful enough to light some seriously big screens, versatile enough to handle just about any connection or media type, and aggressively priced within its performance class. It also has some features not found in other Pro G-series projectors that make it ideal for digital signage. And at $6,499, you can’t beat its combination of features and performance.

The Viewing Experience

At 6,000 lumens, the Pro G6900WU is built to be used on large screens, typically in the presence of ambient light. As such, our light-controlled theater is not exactly the ideal environment. It was not a surprise when the projector started up and bathed the entire room in reflected screen light. We toned down the image brightness by switching into ECO lamp mode and increasing the screen size, but the Pro G6900WU is clearly intended for larger, brighter spaces.The most striking thing about the Pro G6900WU’s image is its excellent color. The Pro G6900WU produces bright, saturated color in every image mode, and this goes a long way towards creating a natural-looking image. This is especially helpful when displaying data graphics or photography, because brightness does not drop off when a full-color image is put on screen. While this is not unique in data projectors, it is also not a given.
The projector’s color performance made us curious how it would perform with 1080p video. As it turns out, the answer is “quite well.” The Pro G6900WU uses Faroudja DCDi technology to process video signals, and the result is a smooth video image with great detail. The only weak point is black level, and even then the Pro G6900WU performs admirably for a projector in its class. It is not built to be a dedicated video projector, but it does very well in a pinch or for part-time use. And on the bright side, the projector’s dynamic range is sufficient to prevent crushing of shadow detail.

The Pro G6900WU includes quite a few little touches that make video more pleasant to watch, such as an automatic iris and frame interpolation. The iris brings down black level and can be very helpful when viewing video or film, but only if room lighting can be reduced as well.

Frame interpolation smooths out judder in film and video. The Pro G6900WU’s FI circuit is more or less identical to those found on Epson home theater projectors. There are three different modes, labeled Low, Normal, and High. Low mode was most appropriate for film, as it displayed the fewest artifacts and the least amount of digital video or “soap opera” effect. High mode is overkill for film and 24p content, but has no negative effect on 60p video signals. Keep in mind that Frame Interpolation is not for everyone; some folks do not enjoy the effect when viewing film, but there are no real downsides to using it with video.

In short, the Pro G6900WU’s image is bright, color is excellent, and video quality is superb for its class. The projector’s black level is typical for a data projector, but in an auditorium this actually matters very little — and with the auto-iris engaged and the lights dimmed, black level becomes quite good.

Setup and Configuration

Gone are the days when a 6000-lumen projector was a heavy behemoth that required a lot of muscle to install. The Pro G6900WU is small enough to be easily deployed pretty much any way you want to use it. It can be ceiling mounted, installed in a projection closet, or even placed on a rolling cart if mobility is desired. There is an assortment of six optional lenses to choose from which will allow you to fill a 180″ diagonal screen from a throw distance of anywhere from 8’2″ to 84’7″ (with the exception of a break in the range from 10 to 16 feet).

The Pro G6900WU comes with the Standard Zoom lens, a 1.82:1 manual zoom/focus lens that will put a 180″ image on screen from 16′ to just over 29′. The projector is available either as a bundle with the Standard Zoom, or as a bare body (Pro G6900WUNL, with the “NL” standing for “No Lens”). The latter is priced at $5,199 to the former’s $6,499. The lenses vary in price, with the Standard Zoom selling for $1,399, the Short Throw Zoom selling for $2,999, and the other lenses all priced at $1,899.

As for lens shift, the projector allows for both vertical and horizontal adjustment using manually-operated thumb knobs on the top of the projector. Once lens shift is dialed in, the projector has a sliding lock bar that prevents further adjustment or drift.

The exact range of the lens shift changes with each lens, but the standard lens allows for approximately 70% vertical adjustment in either direction and about 33% adjustment to the left or right. On a hypothetical 180″ diagonal image (95″ high by 153″ wide), that’s 66.5″ range up or down and 46″ of adjustment to the left or right.

The Pro G6900WU can be installed in an auditorium, but it can also be used on curved surfaces, hard corners, ceilings, floors, and portrait orientations. Digital signage-oriented features like arc correction, edge blending, corner wall projection, and 360-degree display make it possible to install the Pro G6900WU in positions that are either difficult or impossible for many other projectors.

The Pro G6900WU is easy to install and maintain, and even a surface-level examination of the projector reveals some thoughtful touches. The projector’s lens mount uses a quick-release system, so you can swap out lenses without a screwdriver. The air filter door uses a sliding lock system and filters can be changed without tools — though the air filter is built to last 10,000 hours, so it’s only an occasional maintenance item. The lamp door on the projector’s side is attached with two Phillips screws, so unfortunately lamp changes still require a screwdriver.

One final note: The Pro G6900WU includes a third lamp power selection called “Temp Interlock.” This mode keeps the lamp at full power unless the surrounding temperature rises outside the range for normal operation, at which point lamp power switches to ECO. If you were going to keep the lamp at full power, there is no reason not to use this setting, as it can help preserve your projector and improve lamp life.

Key Features

Image quality. The Pro G6900WU’s stand-out feature is the balanced, natural quality of the image even in the projector’s brightest modes. The Pro G6900WU has well-saturated, bright color, a sharp and detailed image, and great dynamic range. The projector is as strong in video display as it is in data thanks in part to a Faroudja DCDi image processor, an automatic iris, and frame interpolation.

Connectivity. Nearly the entire rear surface of the Pro G6900WU is taken up by its connection panel. As the flagship model of Epson’s new G series, the Pro G6900WU features connectors for HDMI, DisplayPort, VGA, VGA monitor out, S-Video, composite, 5BNC component, wired LAN, WiFi (with a $99 adapter), both 1/8″ and RCA audio inputs, HDBaseT, and HD-SDI. That last one in particular is not found on any other projectors in the G Series line-up and is unique to the Pro G6900WU.

HDBaseT is getting a lot of attention lately, and for good reason. It combines HDMI, ethernet, and RS232 control over one inexpensive, non-proprietary, easily sourced Cat5e or Cat6 cable. Epson sells an HDBaseT transmitter box for $499 that bundles HDMI, Ethernet, and RS232 and sends them out over a single wire, but aftermarket products are also an option.

Arc correction. If your screen isn’t flat, the Pro G6900WU can correct for that. Arc Correction allows you to digitally fine-tune the projection geometry to compensate for a screen surface that is not perfectly flat. In other words, the Pro G6900WU can be used on curved screens without pincushion or barrel distortion. Moreover, the projector is capable of correcting focus in non-flat images, keeping your entire image crisp and clear. Arc correction does apply scaling to the image, so if you are using WUXGA or 1080p content you will lose the benefit of 1:1 native display.

Edge blending. For large-scale screens that require more than one projector, the Pro G6900WU has Advanced Edge Blending. All projectors in Epson’s G Series offer edge blending — the ability to seamlessly stitch the edges of two or more projectors’ images in order to make one fully integrated image. But the Pro G6900WU has the “advanced” version, which also includes support for curved surfaces and corner walls.

360-degree installation. Many projectors can only be installed horizontally due to heat concerns, but the Pro G6900WU can be installed in any position. One of several features aimed at digital signage, this allows the projector to be mounted in any orientation without fear of overheating or malfunction.

When you combine these three features — arc correction, edge blending, and 360-degree installation — you gain the ability to install the Pro G6900WU in some radically non-traditional setups, making it perfect for digital signage. You can aim the projector at a floor or ceiling, or project onto a vertically oriented screen. Getting more creative, you can use the Corner Wall feature to project a portrait-oriented image onto a curved pillar or sharp 90-degree corner. Getting more creative still, you can use a series of Pro G6900WU projectors to edge-blend a huge display all the way down one wall, around a corner, and onto the next. You could extend that display up onto the ceiling or down onto the floor. The flexibility afforded by these features make the Pro G6900WU a perfect projector for use in digital signage applications.

Scheduling and control. Like most large-venue projectors, the Pro G6900WU can be monitored and controlled over a wired network. Unlike most other comparable projectors, though, the Pro G6900WU has a scheduling feature that allows the projector to be programmed based on a timer and internal clock, which is especially useful in places where network connectivity is unavailable. Using the Scheduler, you can program the projector to turn itself on and off, change sources, change lamp power, mute sound and video, and adjust the volume. These actions can be programmed for a specific date or a repeating day of the week. While the scheduler is not as comprehensive as network monitoring, it is a great way to ensure that a projector does not accidentally stay on all night. It’s also ideal for digital signage — all of your displays can be set to turn off at the close of business, automatically.

Low fan noise. The Pro G6900WU is a bright projector, but it doesn’t sound like one. Fan noise, while not whisper-quiet, is comparable to what you’d get out of home theater projectors from a few years back – a low rush of air, noticeable but not annoying. That is a nice bonus, particularly if you’ve got the projector on a rolling cart close to the audience in the center aisle of a conference room.

3 year warranty with overnight replacement. When it comes to projector warranties, three years is about as good as it gets. But the Pro G6900WU’s warranty also includes Epson’s Road Service program, so if your projector fails while it is under warranty, Epson will overnight ship a replacement projector to you, free of charge. The warranty also includes 90 days of coverage on the lamp.

You Can Buy Epson Projector at https://projectorpro.in.th

Review Projector BenQ MW705

  • PROS

    WXGA (1,280-by-800) native resolution. Bright 4,000-lumen rating. Light enough to carry with you. Near-excellent image quality for data images. Hidden compartment for wireless streaming module.

  • CONS

    With data images, some colors are a little dark. Shows rainbow artifacts with full-motion video. Weak audio.

  • BOTTOM LINE

    Bright enough for a midsize room and light enough to carry easily, the BenQ MW705 projector will be of particular interest to anyone who wants to take advantage of its hidden compartment for a wireless streaming module.

    Rated at 4,000 lumens and weighing 6 pounds 10 ounces, the BenQ MW705 is bright enough for a midsize room and light enough to tote easily. Like a growing number of projectors, it also features a hidden compartment for a wireless streaming module, if you want to add one. The combination of light weight and the hidden compartment, which gives you a convenient place to connect the module permanently, helps make the projector particularly attractive for anyone who wants the convenience of quick, cable-free setup with mobile devices, including laptops.

Brightness

As always with DLP projectors, brightness comparisons are a little complicated. Both Epson models are built around three-chip LCD engines, which ensures matching levels of color and white brightness. In contrast, both the MW705 and the Ricoh WX5460—like most single-chip DLP data projectors—have a lower color than white brightness. The difference in the two levels means the MW705 won’t be as bright for full-color images as you would expect from the white brightness. (For more on the topic, see Color Brightness: What It Is, Why It Matters.)

Keeping that qualification in mind, and strictly as a point of reference, according to the Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers (SMPTE) recommendations, the 4,000-lumen rating for the MW705 should make it bright enough in theater-dark lighting for a 241- to 326-inch image (measured diagonally) at its native 16:10 aspect ratio and assuming a 1.0-gain screen. With moderate ambient light, the appropriate size drops to 160 inches. For smaller screen sizes, you can lower the brightness level by using one of the projector’s lower-brightness predefined modes, its Eco mode, or both.

Rainbow Artifacts and 3D

One of the key disadvantages of single-chip DLP projectors is that, unlike three-chip LCD projectors, they can show rainbow artifacts (red-green-blue flashes). That’s at least somewhat balanced by the advantage that most offer 3D support, which is rare for LCD data projectors.

In my tests, the MW705 showed rainbow artifacts infrequently enough with static data images that it’s unlikely anyone will find them bothersome. The only time I saw any was with one image that’s designed to bring them out. With full-motion video, however, they showed often enough that anyone who sees them easily may find them annoying. That makes the projector suitable for showing video clips limited to a minute or two at most.

If you need 3D, the MW705 supports all HDMI 1.4a 3D formats, using DLP-Link glasses only. However, this won’t matter in most cases, since few people need 3D for data projector applications.

Hidden Compartment and Setup

The hidden compartment for the wireless module is on the MW705’s upper side on the back left. The cover, which is held on by a screw, lifts off to reveal an HDMI port. Unlike similar compartments on some other projectors, there’s no USB Type A port in the compartment for providing power. However, the HDMI port is MHL enabled, which means it will work with any device that can get power over MHL, including the BenQ QCast Wireless Streaming module.

Hidden compartments for wireless streaming modules are showing up on more and more models. However, the MW705 adds a notable convenience that we haven’t seen on other projectors: One of the image source buttons on the remote is labeled QCast, which means you can switch to your wireless module by pressing a single button on the remote. According to BenQ,the QCast button will switch to any streaming module you choose to connect to the hidden HDMI port, QCast or not.

The compartment can be particularly helpful for portable use. If you set up your projector and mobile device to connect directly using the module, setting up on the road will be quick and easy, with the module already plugged in and no need to connect a cable. Alternatively, if you set the projector up in one room permanently, it provides a convenient place to store the module. Needing a screwdriver to remove the cover also offers some modest protection against someone walking off with it.

Setup is otherwise standard, with a manual focus and manual 1.1x zoom. Image inputs on the back include a second HDMI port, one VGA port for a computer or component video, and both composite and S-video ports. There’s also a USB Type A port, but it’s strictly for providing power. The HDMI port on the back does not support MHL.

Image and Audio Quality

The MW705’s quality for data images is near excellent overall. On our DisplayMate tests, some colors were dark in terms of a hue-saturation-brightness model with every preset mode, that that’s expected for projectors with a lower color than white brightness. Color balance was excellent, with suitably neutral grays at all levels from white to black in every preset mode.

More important for most data images is that the MW705 does a good job holding detail. With text, for example, white text on black were highly readable at 9 points in my tests and black text on white were crisp and readable at 6.8 points.

With full-motion video, the MW705 delivered near-excellent color quality in my tests with good to excellent shadow detail (details based on shading in dark areas). However, long video sessions are still best avoided, since there may be people in your audience who see rainbow artifacts easily and find them annoying.
The audio system, built around a 2-watt mono speaker, is severely underpowered for this bright a projector. The sound quality is more than acceptable, but it doesn’t fill even a small room. If you need sound, plan on connecting an external sound system to the stereo audio output.

Conclusion

For applications that need video, consider the Epson 955WH, the Epson 1940W, or the Ricoh WX5460. As three-chip LCD projectors, both Epson models are guaranteed rainbow free, with the Epson 1940W offering the brighter image of the two. The Ricoh projector adds 3D support, and it shows rainbow artifacts infrequently enough with video so that few, if any, people will find them bothersome. For applications that don’t need to show more than a minute or two of video at a time, however, and particularly those that can benefit from adding a wireless streaming module, the BenQ MW705 is worth a close look.
See more Projector Review, Spec and Product at https://projectorpro.in.th

Review Projector Acer C205

  • PROS

    Small and portable. Can project from and charge MHL-enabled tablets and smartphones. Reasonably strong, good-quality audio.

  • CONS

    Limited to HDMI/MHL connectivity. Poor text quality. Some rainbow effect in video in our tests.

  • BOTTOM LINE

    The Acer C205 is a compact projector of modest brightness and decent audio output, designed for businesspeople who need to give presentations in small rooms.

The C205 is an LED-based DLP projector with a rated brightness of 200 lumens and native WVGA (854-by-480) resolution. Acer claims a lamp life of up to 20,000 hours in Standard mode and 30,000 hours in Eco mode, so the light source should last the lifetime of the projector.

The chassis measures 1.1 by 5.7 by 4.3 inches (HWD) and has a simple, handsome design. It’s rectangular with semicircular wings that house its two 2-watt speakers. The speaker and ventilation grilles are silver, while the rest of the projector is white. The projector itself weighs 10.7 ounces; adding the power adapter brings the total weight up to 17 ounces. The small focus wheel is out front, next to the lens.

A built-in, rechargeable 4,200mAh battery provides up to 2 hours of cable-free operation. Connectivity is limited to an HDMI port, which also supports MHL, letting you connect to an MHL-compatible smartphone or tablet to project images, as well as charge the mobile device. There’s a USB Type A port, but its only function is to let you charge a USB device, such as a smartphone. The projector also has an audio-in jack.

Testing

I tested the C205 from about 5 feet away from the screen, where it threw a 4-foot (diagonal) image. There was some degradation in image quality with the introduction of ambient light; the image looked better when I reduced it to about 36 inches (diagonal).

Data-image quality, while otherwise decent, is brought down by poor text quality. Black text on white was readable (though not sharp) at 10.5 points, while white text on black was only easily readable at 12 points or larger. You could use the C205 for presentations, but you’ll want to stick to larger type, and it’s best to use black type on a light-colored or a white background. The upside is that there’s no tinting to speak of, and colors are well-saturated, though there is some pixel jitter.

I noticed rainbow artifacts—small red-green-blue flashes—in some bright areas against dark backgrounds. This so-called rainbow effect, which is frequently seen in single-chip DLP projectors, is less of a problem with data images than with video. Even those sensitive to the effect are unlikely to be bothered by it when watching data presentations with the C205.

Video and Audio

In our testing, video was of a quality suitable for shorter clips as part of a presentation. Rainbow artifacts were more apparent in video than they were in data images in our tests, and they’d likely be distracting to those sensitive to the effect. When you’re presenting on the road, you have no way of knowing how sensitive to these artifacts your audience may be, and thus you’re best off using video sparingly with this projector.

Also, some pixelation due to the projector’s relatively modest resolution is evident in video. This can be counteracted by keeping the projected image relatively small; a 36-inch (diagonal) image is a good size both to reduce pixelation and to keep the image relatively bright.

Audio from the twin 2-watt speakers is of decent quality, and should be fine for a small room. This puts the C205 ahead of the many palmtop projectors that are barely audible unless you’re sitting very close to them.

The C205 could be thought of as a miniature version of the Acer K137 it’s smaller, and has lower brightness and resolution than that 700-lumen WXGA model. The Acer K137 has slightly more powerful (two 3-watt) speakers as well. The C205 is even more portable, and sells at barely half the price of the K137.

The AAXA P4-X Pico Projector, Editors’ Choice as a micro-projector (pico or palmtop) is dimmer than the C205. It’s rated at just 80 lumens, or 50 lumens if you’re running it from its battery. Even so, it showed surprisingly good image quality in our tests, with good text quality and decent video with a minimum of rainbow artifacts. It also has the ability to project content from a microSD card or a USB thumb drive.

That said, the AAXA P4-X’s sound is barely audible. If audio is important to your presentations (and text quality isn’t vital), and if you can connect with HDMI or MHL, the Acer C205 is worth considering.

PROJECTOR EPSON EB-535W WXGA 3LCD Projector

The ultra bright, widescreen short-throw projector for reliable performance.

Featuring ultra bright widescreen performance, the easy-to-use PowerLite 535W short-throw projector offers engaging classroom lessons. Delivering 3x Brighter Colors* than competitive models, Epson® 3LCD projectors ensure vibrant images. Featuring 3400 lumens of color brightness and 3400 lumens of white brightness1, the 535W shines – even in sunny rooms. Project images up to 116″ from 4′ away with minimal shadows or glare. Utilizing low-cost, long-lasting lamps, this reliable performer provides a low total cost of ownership. It also features flexible installation. Plus, Moderator device management software2 allows instructors to wirelessly share3 students’ work from multiple devices, simultaneously – including computers, iOS® and Android™ devices.

3x Brighter Colors with Epson*
Brilliant image quality requires high color brightness. Epson 3LCD projectors have 3x Brighter Colors than leading competitive projectors*. Delivering 3400 lumens of color brightness1 and 3400 lumens of white brightness1, the PowerLite 535W uses 3LCD, 3-chip technology for brilliant images with true-to-life color.

The Epson PowerLite 520/530 Series
Model Comparison
PowerLite® Model 520 525W 530 535W
Resolution XGA WXGA XGA WXGA
Color Brightness1 2700 2800 3200 3400
White Brightness1 2700 2800 3200 3400

Projection System: 3LCD, 3-chip technology
Native Resolution: 1280 x 800 (WXGA)
Color Brightness: 3400 lumens
White Brightness: 3400 lumens

  • Giant, widescreen images — native WXGA resolution and 16:10 format
  • Large, engaging presentations, even in small spaces — short throw distance saves space; project a 116″ image from just 4′ away with minimal shadows and glare
  • Long-lasting, low-cost lamps — up to 10,000 hours in ECO Mode
  • Flexible placement — install using a wall mount (optional) or place on a tabletop or cart
  • Convenient collaboration for BYOD classrooms — wirelessly share and compare students’ work from multiple devices, simultaneously, with Moderator device management software
  • Wireless projection from an array of devices — project from iPhone®, iPad®, Android tablets and smartphones with the free Epson iProjectionTM App (wireless module sold separately)
  • Manage projectors and present remotely — easy network connectivity; software included
  • Powerful sound to engage every student — includes a built-in 16 W speaker and microphone input; or, use external speakers, even in Standby Mode

Eco Features

  • RoHS compliant
  • Recyclable product
  • Epson America, Inc. is a SmartWay™ Transport Partner

Buy now at https://projectorpro.in.th

BenQ W1070 Home Theater Projector Review

BenQ W1070 Highlights

  • 2000 lumens bright – suitable for family/living/bonus rooms
  • 3D Capable
  • Higher contrast for better blacks, than most low cost projectors
  • 10 watts of Audio, audio output
  • Full color management controls, ISF certified
  • Minimal lag times for great gaming
  • Remote control
  • Smart-Eco for energy efficiency (see more below)
  • Very long lamp life (for low cost of operation)
  • New lighter 3D glasses from BenQ (not included)
  • Excellent warranty
  • Lowest priced 1080p 3D capable projector we’ve reviewed so far

BenQ W1070 Projector Overview

The BenQ W1070 is a Light Canon of a projector! Mind you, there’s no official determination of how bright a projector has to be to be one, but I’ve referred, in the past to a number of projectors as light canons, that even in their brighest modes, can’t match this 2000 lumen rated BenQ W1070 even after its calibrated.

This is a single chip DLP projector. A small one. Although you can find a few smaller home entertainment projectors that are smaller (all DLP) I can’t think of a single 1080p LCD projector that isn’t dramatically larger.

Physically the W1070 looks pretty cool, or at least cute! But, it’s the picture that we really care about.

I have yet to see an official price. The projector is just starting to arrive in the US, even though it’s been available in Europe and elsewhere for months. In the EU it’s supposed to be $749 last I checked. It turns out that the official US price is $1099. It’s the lowest cost 1080p 3D capable projector yet to grace our theaters.

The projector is just starting to ship in the US as this is published. 3D Glasses are not included. The official price for the glasses is $79. Even that is a little less than most others.

Contrast, it should be noted, is also a lot higher than most of the competiton, which should indicate respectable black levels for the price. Just don’t expect too much in that regard, as projectors with great black levels are typically at least $2500. It’s less of an issue in a typical family room type environment.

Let’s take a quick look at some bullet point highlight, some specs and then we can get into the meat of this projector review!


BenQ W1070 3D

3D looks very good. Before I get going on the BenQ’s 3D I’ve got an interesting story (cautionary tale) before I go further. I’ve been having problems with one of my long cables of late, ordered in someone’s “top of the line” cables (off of Amazon – I was in a real hurry), and when I put on John Carter in 3D last evening, all kinds of crosstalk and judder. Switched back to that truly (but 5 year old), top of the line cable – an Ultralink, and all that garbage went away. I confirmed that the problems also were there when I switched to an expensive JVC projector. BTW the issue was with Blu-ray 3D, side-by-side off of HDTV didn’t seem to suffer.

If you think you are the type who will upgrade in a couple of years (maybe to a 4K projector when they become affordable), that’s a killer reason for buying really good cables.

Back to the 3D performance. With a proper cable, crosstalk is a non-factor. I found watching 3D to be rather enjoyable and relatively bright. Color was pretty good (in 3D), I don’t expect color as good as 2D, and we have never tried to calibrate 3D.  The excellent brightness allowed me to put on some widescreen movies and fill my 124″ diagonal.  Not bad, watchably bright.  At 100″ diagonal there’s plenty of lumens for 3D.  After all, consider that 400 lumens is more than enough (with proper lack of ambient light) to watch a 100″ screen.  With over 1700 lumens calibrated, that’s more than 4 times as much.  3D no longer costs 75% of brightness even if it does cost viewers a good bit more than half the brightness.  Translated, this W1070 can do a great job in 3D on an average sized screen.

I was very pleased with HDTV 3D.  Everything from a Penn State football game, and some little league baseball I recorded in 3D, to a National Parks tour of Arches, looked really good.

Color remained good even in 3D.  Of course we never attempt to calibrate 3D, so I’m sure it could be improved.  If we find a 3D calibration disc, at some point I’ll have Mike calibrate some 3D modes on future projectors.

Overall, very good 3D, lots of brightness, and an almost total lack of rainbow effect  (for me) make this W1070 the best lower cost DLP projector for 3D that I’ve played with.

In other words:  I really like it!

If you want to buy other BenQ Projector at https://projectorpro.in.th

Acer K335 LED Portable Projector Review

The Acer K335 is a versatile WXGA (1280 X 800) DLP pocket projector with enough light output to deal with less than ideal lighting conditions despite its small size!

สินค้า Projector ACER K335

Acer K335 Projector Highlights

  • Small and Lightweight 2.87 lbs
  • Good light output with near to 700 lumens (measured)
  • HDMI and Analog VGA inputs
  • Supports MHL for use with compatible MHL equipped mobile/portable devices
  • Ability to display from iPads – iPhones (w/ iOS 5.0 or later) and Android tablets – phones (w/ Andorid 4.0 or later) with optional adapters/cables and ‘eDisplay’ App software
  • Can play media files from SD cards or USB flash drives
  • 3D capable for computer-based 3D sources (not Blu-ray 3D compatible)
  • Built-in mono speaker suitable for use in small conference rooms
  • Can support wireless (Wi-Fi) input with an optional adapter
  • Short lag times make the model suitable for gaming

Acer K335 Projector Overview

The Acer K335 projector is a WXGA (1280 X 800) DLP projector that offers an increase in light output from the earlier Acer K330 model.  The K335 has  a similar size, weight and control layout as the K330.  However, the new model has a somewhat different front panel layout for the lens and IR remote sensor while the rear panel connector layout is very similar to the earlier model  The K335 is rated to 1000 lumens, which is double the rated light output of the earlier K330 model.  In our tests neither the K330 nor the K335 were measured to produce the manufacturer’s rated light output, but the K335 is significant brighter than the K330, as well as producing more lumens of light output than most other competitors LED portable/pocket projectors.  This makes the K335 a very versatile pocket projector that offers adequate light output to deal with less than ideal lighting conditions.  The K335 LED light source is rated to last 20,000 hours, which is typical for recent LED-based portable projectors.  The K335 has a fixed lens, with no optical zooming or optical lens shift.  It does offer a digital zoom function but this simply enlarges a portion of the image and is not a substitute for an optical zoom lens.  As a result, the K335 will need to be  placed at the proper distance from the screen in order to obtain the image size desired.  Also it will need to be positioned at the proper height relative to the screen, if use of digital keystone correction is to be avoided.  When the ideal projector height (relative to the screen) cannot be provided the K335 has very good automatic digital keystone correction to facilitate setup.  The works thru the K335 having an internal tilt sensor that applies the correct amount of keystone correction within a couple of seconds after the tilt of the projector is changed.  The K335 has a throw ratio of approx. 1.25:1 meaning with a projector-to-screen throw distance of 8 feet (96 inches) the image will be about (96/1.25=) 76 inches wide.  Note this the width of the image and not the diagonal size.  The K335’s rear panel offers connection for the most common video inputs, including HDMI, VGA and composite video as well as an analog audio input.  It can also project from a USB thumb drive, an SD card, from an iPad /iPhone (w/ iOS 5.0 or later and with optional adapter), or from Android tablets/phones (w/ Android 4.0 or later).  The K335 has provisions for displaying not only photos, video and audio files directly from a USB or SD memory card, but the K335 can also display Microsoft Office documents.  This capability for PC-free presentations could be a useful feature on a portable mini-projector for the ‘road warrior’ that likes to travel light

There is also a built-in three watt speaker that is adequate only for small rooms, but fortunately, there is also an audio output jack for use with amplified external speakers. The K335’s light weight and compact size makes it a good choice for traveling.  Like many other small, portable projectors the K335 does not have a battery option, but with the relatively high light output of the K335, a battery option is probably not feasible.  Unlike some other small portable projectors, the K335 has its power supply is built in, so it only uses a standard power cord, thus improving its portability.  The K335 also comes with a nice carrying case with a front pocket just large enough to accommodate the remote control, power cable and a couple small accessories (e.g., memory card, HDMI cable).  The Acer K335’s combination of fairly high light output (for this class of projector), decent contrast, acceptable color accuracy, long LED light source life, and modest price will appeal to those in the market for a pico or pocket projector for business use, but need more lumens of light output than is found in many projectors in this class.


Acer K335 Special Features

20,000 Hour LED Life – The Acer K335 uses an LED light source that is rated to last 20,000 hours.  This is likely longer than the life of the projector

Presentations from USB flash Drive, SD Card, iPhone/iPad/iPod or Android tablet/phone – The Acer K335 has built-in ports allowing for presentations from a USB flash drive or SD memory card.  Through the use of an optional adapter, the Acer K335 can present photos and videos from iPhone/iPad/iPod or from an Android tablet or phone.

Display of Microsoft Office Documents -The K335 can directly accept Word, Excel and Powerpoint files from a SD memory card or USB drive and project the contents of the document.  The allows for MS Office documents to simply be loaded into the projector from a flash memory drive (USB or SD card) without the need to connect a PC to the projector.  The Acer documentation does not specifically indicate which versions of MS Office documents are supported.

Game Ready – The Acer K335 has ‘Game’ mode and along with a relatively short lag time make this model suitable for gaming.

3D Ready – The Acer K335 is 3D ready via its implementation of DLP Link.  It can only accept 3D from a suitably equipped source (e.g., PC) that is capable of providing 3D in a alternating frame mode.   The K335 is not compatible with the most common 3D video signal formats that are used with Blu-ray Discs and for 3D channels distributed by satellite or cable TV services.  The 3D capabilities of the K335 were not evaluated for this review.

Support for Wireless Input – The K335 supports a WiFi input with the addition of an optional Wi-Fi adapter.  The Acer Wi-Fi adapter was not provided with the review unit and as a result the Wi-Fi capabilities of the K335 were not evaluated for this review.

– If you want to buy Projector Acer K335 or Other Acer Projector please click this link : https://projectorpro.in.th

How Do I Choose the Right Screen for My Projector?

In this article, Art walks through a commonly-asked question, “How do I choose the right screen for my projector?”

ABOUT THIS ARTICLE

I first wrote this in response to a question about screens from someone who recently purchased a Sony VPL-HW40ES projector.  That’s a projector that musters up about 1700 lumens, and well over 1000 lumens even calibrated.
The same general advice about screens would apply to a great many of today’s projectors.  The more expensive HW55ES for example is only slightly less bright, and while better suited for a dedicated theater, the same advice for screens applies.  It would also apply to most Epson projectors as they tend to have 1500 to 2400 lumens to work with, the Panasonics fit too.   JVC projectors aren’t quite as bright, but this would still be helpful, just realize that those JVCs are typically under 1000 lumens calibrated, so the same rules, slightly smaller screen.  While some popular Epsons and Panasonics only calibrate in the 500 – 700 lumen range for their best picture, they have very good “brighter modes which are still in the 1500 lumen range.  Thus, when using those better modes, the screen advice again becomes virtually identical to the HW40ES this article was written for.
When it comes to many of the DLP projectors – Viewsonic projectors, Optomas, BenQs, Viviteks, Acers, etc.  the brightness tends to vary greatly from model to model.  Again, if those projectors can muster up a good picture with 1200 to 2400 lumens, this advice applies.  If the projectors are lower brightness such as the Sharp XV-Z30000, and definitely some of the Optomas and BenQs… then the problem is that some of those really aren’t geared for rooms with any significant ambient light present.  Keep them in cave light environments, or use them only at night when those rooms can be almost fully darkened.
CHOOSING A SCREEN FOR YOUR ROOM
The trick is to match the screen to three things:
1.  The room
2.  What you watch – and when
3.  The projector
We’ll consider the HW40ES – 1700 lumens, which, at least by Sony’s “intent” is their projector geared for less of a home theater (dark walls and other surfaces, very good lighting control), than for a living room, media room, bonus room, family room…basically  less ideal rooms.  (Their more expensive HW55ES is better matched for a true home theater/cave.)   These other rooms typically are without the ability to block out all outside light during the daytime    The darker the surfaces in your room, the better.
In a previous home of mine (photos on the right), I took near white walls and ceilings and darkened the ceilings (same off white shade) by several shades.  They still appeared to be “off-white” because they were still the brightest surfaces in the room. I also took the walls from an “off-white” to a rust color.  Oh what a huge difference it made.  For that room I used a Stewart Firehawk, which is pretty good at rejecting side ambient light.
I’ve had projectors set up in such rooms.  One can get those rooms dark enough tor casual viewing – sports, most HDTV in general, but too bright to really be ideal for viewing movies.
You’ll have to decide if movie viewing will be reserved for when you can keep the room pretty dark.  That would affect your screen decision.
If you have one of the latter types of rooms, and you are planning to watch a mix of general HDTV and movies, then you’ll want a screen that can “help out” with dealing with ambient light.  That’s typically what are known as High Contrast gray screens.  (Gains from 0.5 to 1.3).  They can reject a fair amount of side ambient light, providing a much better picture.  Still, movie viewing will be best at night, when you have full lighting control even with the right screen, if your room has a fair amount of ambient light (I’m not talking bright, I’m talking modest amounts – ie light leaking in around dark window shades…
DEDICATED THEATER OR CAVE-LIKE ROOMS
If your room is more theater like, with full lighting control, then you don’t need to worry so much about side ambient light (unless, say you want lighting sconces on the sides that you have on low while watching movies (like some movie theaters).    In that case, you go with a standard gain white screens from gains of 1 to 1.4 for widest viewing areas.
HELPFUL VIDEOS
I created videos that you may find helpful, check them out on our Projector Reviews TV tab on our website.  The good news is that the HW40ES is one of the brighter high quality projectors around.
BUDGET
Your budget also comes into play.  The higher tech screens – my old Firehawk was very good, but not “state of the art”  – can almost work wonders.  I just installed a Screen Innovations Slate in a very bright living room, so I could test projectors in a near “awful” room.   That’s a pricey screen – motorized, it’s around double the Sony HW40’s price.  ($4000+ for 100” diagonal – motorized).  I think about half that for fixed wall.  The Firehawk G3 (or G4) isn’t much less.  Screen Innovations Black Diamond series, say their 1.4 gain, is even more money, but the best around for handling ambient light, at least in my experience.
If you don’t need a great light rejecting/absorbing screen, then fixed wall screens start at under $400 (brands like Elite Screens) and even the premium brands are around $2000, but many big names i.e. Da-Lite, fall in the $500 to $1000 range.  Those brands typically have motorized screens from $500 to $2000 depending on brand and size.
If your room is theater/cave like, then just decide your budget, and score an Elite if it’s low, or maybe a Carada (I use their Brilliant White 1.4 gain in my testing room). Otherwise look to screens like the Da-lite Cinemavision, and Da-Mat.
Lisa Feierman


We have the screen from iScreen Brand at https://projectorpro.in.th/screen.html